Northern Ireland Attractions

Northern Ireland attractions - Children attractions and places to visit in Northern Ireland

Visitor attractions and information - Ballycastle

visitor attractions

Attractions Ballycastle Museum, 59 Castle Street, Ballycastle, County Antrim, BT54 6AS -
Tel: 028 2076 2942. Folk/social history of the Glens in the town's 18th-century courthouse. Exhibits include the Glentaisie banner of the first Feis na Gleann (1904). Admission free.
Location: In the centre of Ballycastle.

Ballycastle Museum

Giant's Causeway Visitor Centre

Attractions Giant's Causeway Visitor Centre, 44 Causeway Road, Bushmills BT57 8SU - Tel: 028-2073-1855. Northern Ireland's most popular tourist destination, this large stretch of staircase-shaped rocks is a geological freak, the result of cooled lava from volcanic eruptions that took place over 65 million years ago. About 8 miles west of Ballycastle.

Giant's Causeway

Attractions Carrick-a-Rede bridge, near Ballycastle, is a swinging rope bridge spanning an 800 feet wide chasm connecting the main land to the Carrick-a-Rede island which is used by fishermen. The bridge crossing is quite thrilling and not for the faint hearted! It is open between the months of April and September. About 3 miles northwest of Ballycastle.

Carrick-a-Rede bridge

Attractions Old Bushmills Distillery, Bushmills, Co. Antrim Tel: 028 2073-3218. The Old Bushmills Distillery is devoted to the production of Single Malt Irish Whiskey. It is the world’s oldest licensed whiskey distillery having received its licence to distil in 1608 by James 1of England. An exceptional aspect of The Old Bushmills Distillery is the fact that distilling, blending, maturation and bottling are all carried out under one roof. www.bushmills.com. About 8 miles west of Ballycastle.

Old Bushmills Distillery

Ballycastle hotels

Visitor attractions and information - Ballymoney

Attractions Mountsandel Fort, Mountsandel Road, Coleraine - Tel: 028 2955 6000. Mountsandel Fort is located just south of the town of Coleraine overlooking the River Bann at Castleroe. It dates back to the iron age and is beside the site of the first huntergatherer settlement in Ireland, dating from before 7000 BC. The forest walk goes from the high point at the fort to the banks of the Bann. Open from dawn until dusk every day. Admission: Free. About 5 miles northwest of Ballymoney.

Mountsandel Fort

Giant's Causeway Visitor Centre

Attractions Giant's Causeway Visitor Centre, 44 Causeway Road, Bushmills BT57 8SU - Tel: 028-2073-1855. Northern Ireland's most popular tourist destination, this large stretch of staircase-shaped rocks is a geological freak, the result of cooled lava from volcanic eruptions that took place over 65 million years ago. About 9 miles north of Ballymoney.

Giant's Causeway

Attractions Dunluce Castle, near Portrush. This late-medieval and 17th-century castle is dramatically sited on a headland dropping sheer into the sea on the north Antrim Coast. For information on visits to Dunluce Castle, please contact EHS (Environment and Heritage Service) on Tel: 028 20 73 1938. There is an entrance gate from the car-park into sloping mainland court which is linked to the main buildings on the rock by a narrow footbridge. There are some modern surfaces but there are also areas of original paving and cobbles, which will make access to parts of the site difficult for wheelchair-users. About 8 miles north of Ballymoney.

Dunluce Castle

Ballymoney hotels

Visitor attractions and information - Bangor

Attractions The Ulster Folk and Transport Museum, Cultra, Holywood, Co. Down BT18 OEU - Tel: 028 9042 8428. Voted Irish Museum of the Year, the museum illustrates the way of life and the traditions of the people of the north of Ireland. Set in over 170 acres of rolling countryside, the outdoor Folk Museum tells the story of life in early 20th century Ulster. The Transport Museum, one of the finest in Europe, displays Ireland's largest and most comprehensive transport collection. About 4 miles west of Bangor.

The Ulster Folk and Transport Museum

Attractions The Odyssey, 2 Queens Quay, Belfast BT3 9QQ - Tel: 02890 451055. The Odyssey features night clubs, restaurants, bars and includes bowling, ice hockey, and a large cinema. Concerts and other shows are held here. There is also the W5 complex and Sheridan IMAX. About 8 miles west of Bangor.

The Odyssey

Attractions Queen’s University of Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN - Tel: 02890 245133. Queen’s University is one of the oldest universities in the UK, having been founded in 1810, and has a well-deserved reputation for academic excellence. About 9 miles west of Bangor.

Bangor hotels

Visitor attractions and information - Belfast

Attractions Belfast Castle, Antrim Road, Belfast BT15 5GR - Tel: 02890 776925. Belfast Castle is a familiar landmark situated on the Cave Hill. It was first built by the Normans in the late 12th century. Weddings would commonly be held at the castle. The castle offers many services such as a bar/restaurant, an antiques shop and a visitors centre. Location: On the northwest outskirts of Belfast.

 Belfast Castle

Attractions Cave Hill, Belfast. Cavehill is a basaltic hill which overlooks the city of Belfast. It offers views across the city and on clear days the Isle of Man. Like Arthur's Seat in Edinburgh, it offers a strenuous climb, just a few miles from the centre of a major connurbation. Cavehill rises to almost 370 metres (1,200 feet) above sea level and stretches from Hazelwood in the north to Carr's Glen in the south. Most of its lower-east side is comprised of the Belfast Castle Estate. Situated to the right of Cave Hill is Belfast Zoo. Location: On the outskirts of Belfast.

Cave Hill

Attractions Colin Glen Forest Park, 163 Stewartstown Road, Dunmurry, Belfast BT17 0HW - Tel: 028 9061 4115. Colin Glen Forest Park is made up of over 200 acres of parklands, wildlife ponds and a lake, and is divided by the Colin River. Officially recognised as the starting point of the Ulster way, the forest park leads you to the Belfast Hills including Divis Mountain. Location: On the southwest outskirts of Belfast.

Colin Glen Forest Park

Attractions The Odyssey, 2 Queens Quay, Belfast BT3 9QQ - Tel: 02890 451055. The Odyssey features night clubs, restaurants, bars and includes bowling, ice hockey, and a large cinema. Concerts and other shows are held here. There is also the W5 complex and Sheridan IMAX. Location: In the centre of Belfast.

The Odyssey

Attractions Queen’s University of Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN - Tel: 02890 245133. Queen’s University is one of the oldest universities in the UK, having been founded in 1810, and has a well-deserved reputation for academic excellence. Location: In the centre of Belfast.

Attractions Dundonald International Ice Bowl, 111 Old Dundonald Road, Belfast BT16 1XT - Tel : 028 9080 9100. Dundonald International Ice Bowl is one of Northern Ireland's premier leisure and entertainment facilities, with an Olympic size Ice Rink, 30 lane Ten Pin Bowling Alley and indoor adventure playworld. About 6 miles east of Belfast.

 Dundonald International Ice Bowl

Belfast hotels

Visitor attractions and information - Campsie

Attractions Saint Columb’s Cathedral, Derry. Dominating the skyline on all approaches to the City of Londonderry is Saint Columb’s Cathedral, which has stood on its prominent site inside the famous Walls of Derry since 1633. It is Londonderry's oldest building. This fine Cathedral has a square tower at its west end, upon which is erected an octagonal spire. This tower was built in 1802, and the spire added twenty years later. www.stcolumbscathedral.org. About 6 miles southwest of Campsie.

 Saint Columb’s Cathedral

Attractions The Tower Museum, Union Hall Place, Londonderry BT48 6LU. The Tower Museum is located within the city’s historic walls and has won four major awards since its opening in October 1992. The top of the Tower Museum (level 5) provides the only open air viewing facility in the heart of the city centre with stunning panoramic views of the inner city and river Foyle. About 6 miles southwest of Campsie.

The Tower Museum

Attractions The City Walls Of Derry, Derry, County Londonderry - Tel: 028 7126 7284. The City is the only remaining completely Walled City in Ireland and one of the finest examples in Europe of Walled Cities. These famous walls which date back to the early part of the seventeenth century have withstood several sieges, the most celebrated lasting 105 days. There are fine views from the top of the walls which encircle the old city, a circuit of one mile. Open to the public from dawn until dusk. Admission free. About 6 miles southwest of Campsie.

The City Walls Of Derry

Campsie hotels

Visitor attractions and information - Carnlough

Attractions Carnlough harbour.The picturesque harbour has recently been renovated and is used by pleasure boats and small fishing boats. The area offers many opportunities for both sea angling and fresh water angling. Location: In the centre of Carnlough.

Glenarm Castle Estate and Gardens

Attractions Glenarm Castle Estate and Gardens, 2 Castle Lane, Glenarm, Co.Antrim BT40 1BP. Glenarm Castle dates from 1750, with early 19th century alterations, and was the ancestral home of the McDonnells, Earls of Antrim. The Walled Garden dates from the 18th century. www.glenarmcastle.com. About 4 miles southeast of Carnlough.

Glenarm Castle Estate and Gardens

Attractions The Nine Glens of Antrim are naturally unique with variations in the natural landscape including a 50-mile shoreline, grasslands, forests, peat bogs, mountain uplands, churches and castles. The Antrim Coast Road (built in the 1830s) winds its way around beautiful bays, high cliffs, green fields and castle ruins. Carnlough lies atthe foot of the Glens of Antrim.

The Nine Glens of Antrim

Carnlough hotels

Visitor attractions and information - Carrickfergus

Attractions Carrickfergus Castle stands in a strategic position on a rocky spur above the harbour on the northern shore of Lough Belfast and is a perfectly preserved Norman castle, probably the earliest stone castle in all Ireland. John de Courcy, the Anglo-Norman baron who conquered much of Ulster and governed it from 1177 to 1204 started building the castle in about 1178 to guard the approach to Lough Belfast. Today it is maintained by the Environment and Heritage Service. Location: On the outskirts of Carrickfergus.

Carrickfergus Castle

Attractions Belfast Castle, Antrim Road, Belfast BT15 5GR - Tel: 02890 776925. Belfast Castle is a familiar landmark situated on the Cave Hill. It was first built by the Normans in the late 12th century. Weddings would commonly be held at the castle. The castle offers many services such as a bar/restaurant, an antiques shop and a visitors centre. About 6 miles southwest of Carrickfergus.

Belfast Castle

Attractions Cave Hill, Belfast. Cavehill is a basaltic hill which overlooks the city of Belfast. It offers views across the city and on clear days the Isle of Man. Like Arthur's Seat in Edinburgh, it offers a strenuous climb, just a few miles from the centre of a major connurbation. Cavehill rises to almost 370 metres (1,200 feet) above sea level and stretches from Hazelwood in the north to Carr's Glen in the south. Most of its lower-east side is comprised of the Belfast Castle Estate. Situated to the right of Cave Hill is Belfast Zoo. About 6 miles southwest of Carrickfergus.

Cave Hill

Carrickfergus hotels

Visitor attractions and information - Coleraine

Attractions Mountsandel Fort, Mountsandel Road, Coleraine - Tel: 028 2955 6000. Mountsandel Fort is located just south of the town of Coleraine overlooking the River Bann at Castleroe. It dates back to the iron age and is beside the site of the first huntergatherer settlement in Ireland, dating from before 7000 BC. The forest walk goes from the high point at the fort to the banks of the Bann. Open from dawn until dusk every day. Admission: Free. Location: On the outskirts of Coleraine.

Mountsandel Fort

Attractions Giant's Causeway, 44 Causeway Road, Bushmills BT57 8SU - Tel: 028-2073-1855. Northern Ireland's most popular tourist destination, this large stretch of staircase-shaped rocks is a geological freak, the result of cooled lava from volcanic eruptions that took place over 65 million years ago. About 7 miles northeast of Coleraine.

Giant's Causeway

Attractions Dunluce Castle, near Portrush. This late-medieval and 17th-century castle is dramatically sited on a headland dropping sheer into the sea on the north Antrim Coast. For information on visits to Dunluce Castle, please contact EHS (Environment and Heritage Service) on Tel: 028 20 73 1938. There is an entrance gate from the car-park into sloping mainland court which is linked to the main buildings on the rock by a narrow footbridge. There are some modern surfaces but there are also areas of original paving and cobbles, which will make access to parts of the site difficult for wheelchair-users. About 5 miles north of Coleraine.

Dunluce Castle

Attractions Old Bushmills Distillery, Bushmills, Co. Antrim Tel: 028 2073-3218. The Old Bushmills Distillery is devoted to the production of Single Malt Irish Whiskey. It is the world’s oldest licensed whiskey distillery having received its licence to distil in 1608 by James 1of England. An exceptional aspect of The Old Bushmills Distillery is the fact that distilling, blending, maturation and bottling are all carried out under one roof. www.bushmills.com. About 6 miles northeast of Coleraine.

Old Bushmills Distillery

Attractions Downhill Castle, Mussenden Temple, Bishop’s Gate & Black Glen, 107 Sea Road, Castlerock, BT51 4TW - Tel: 028 7084 8728. Set on a stunning and wild headland with fabulous cliff top walks and views over Ireland’s north coast is the landscaped estate of Downhill, laid out in the late 18th century by the eccentric Earl and Bishop, Frederick Hervey. Estate includes ruins, mausoleum, beautiful gardens and the renowned Mussenden Temple perched on the cliff edge which is available for private hire. About 4 miles northwest of Coleraine.

Downhill Castle

Coleraine hotels

Visitor attractions and information - Comber

Attractions Strangford Lough is separated from the Irish Sea by the Ards Peninsula. It is a popular tourist attraction noted for its fishing and the picturesque villages which border its waters. The island studded sea lough is the largest inlet in the UK and Ireland, covering 150 square kilometres. It is a conservation area and an important winter migration destination for many wading and sea birds. Location: On the eastern outskirts of Comber.

Strangford Lough

Attractions The Ulster Folk and Transport Museum, Cultra, Holywood, Co. Down BT18 OEU - Tel: 028 9042 8428. Voted Irish Museum of the Year, the museum illustrates the way of life and the traditions of the people of the north of Ireland. Set in over 170 acres of rolling countryside, the outdoor Folk Museum tells the story of life in early 20th century Ulster. The Transport Museum, one of the finest in Europe, displays Ireland's largest and most comprehensive transport collection. About 6 miles north of Comber.

The Ulster Folk and Transport Museum

Attractions Dundonald International Ice Bowl, 111 Old Dundonald Road, Belfast BT16 1XT - Tel : 028 9080 9100. Dundonald International Ice Bowl is one of Northern Ireland's premier leisure and entertainment facilities, with an Olympic size Ice Rink, 30 lane Ten Pin Bowling Alley and indoor adventure playworld. About 4 miles northwest of Comber.

 Dundonald International Ice Bowl

Comber hotels

Visitor attractions and information - Derry

Attractions Saint Columb’s Cathedral, Derry. Dominating the skyline on all approaches to the City of Londonderry is Saint Columb’s Cathedral, which has stood on its prominent site inside the famous Walls of Derry since 1633. It is Londonderry's oldest building. This fine Cathedral has a square tower at its west end, upon which is erected an octagonal spire. This tower was built in 1802, and the spire added twenty years later. www.stcolumbscathedral.org. Location: In the centre of Derry.

Saint Columb’s Cathedral

Attractions The Tower Museum, Union Hall Place, Londonderry BT48 6LU. The Tower Museum is located within the city’s historic walls and has won four major awards since its opening in October 1992. The top of the Tower Museum (level 5) provides the only open air viewing facility in the heart of the city centre with stunning panoramic views of the inner city and river Foyle. Location: In the centre of Derry.

The Tower Museum

Attractions The City Walls Of Derry, Derry, County Londonderry - Tel: 028 7126 7284. The City is the only remaining completely Walled City in Ireland and one of the finest examples in Europe of Walled Cities. These famous walls which date back to the early part of the seventeenth century have withstood several sieges, the most celebrated lasting 105 days. There are fine views from the top of the walls which encircle the old city, a circuit of one mile. Open to the public from dawn until dusk. Admission free. Location: In the centre of Derry.

The City Walls Of Derry

Londonderry hotels

Visitor attractions and information - Enniskillen

AttractionsLough Erne refers to two lakes situated along the River Erne. The river begins by flowing north, and then curves west into the Atlantic. The southern-most lake is further up the river and so is named Upper Lough Erne. The northern lake is Lower Lough Erne. Lough Erne is a scenic waterway renowned for its beautiful setting. The lakeside is high and rocky in some parts and, in addition to the 154 islands, there are coves and inlets to explore. The town of Enniskillen is situated between the lakes. Location: On the outskirts of Enniskillen.

Fermanagh County Museum

Attractions Fermanagh County Museum, Enniskillen Castle, Castle Barracks, Enniskillen, Co Fermanagh BT74 7HL - Tel: 028 66 325000. Enniskillen Castle, situated beside the River Erne in County Fermanagh, was built almost 600 years ago by Gaelic Maguires. Guarding one of the few passes into Ulster, it was strategically important throughout its history. In the 17th century it became an English garrison fort and later served as part of a military barracks. www.enniskillencastle.co.uk. Location: In the centre of Enniskillen.

Fermanagh County Museum

Attractions Belleek Pottery Ltd, Main St, Belleek, Enniskillen, Co. Fermanagh BT93 3FY - Tel: 028 6865 8501. Join a guided tour of Ireland’s oldest and most historic pottery and follow your guide as you view the traditional moulding and casting methods. See the creative process applied to our beautiful pieces made to the highest perfection. About 15 miles west of Enniskillen.

Belleek Pottery Ltd

Enniskillen hotels

Visitor attractions and information - Larne

Attractions Olderfleet Castle, Larne. The ruins of Olderfleet Castle tower house stand on the Curran Point to the south of Larne Harbour. A castle was built here by the Scots Bissett family in the 13th century, and they welcomed a Scottish invasion fleet in 1315 which was commanded by Edward Bruce, brother of Robert the Bruce. Location: On the outskirts of Larne.

Olderfleet Castle

Attractions Ulster-American Memorial, Curran Park. An imposing statue featuring three figures is located at Curran Park on Curran Road, and marks the role played by 18th century Ulster emigrants in America. The statue represents a family group on their way to an emigrant ship (the first of which, the Friend's Goodwill, sailed from Larne in May 19l7), and was unveiled in 1992. Curran Park has beautiful trees and flower beds and a fine view overlooking Larne Lough and the hills beyond. Location: In the centre of town.

Ulster-American Memorial

Attractions Larne Lough is situated between Islandmagee (a peninsula) and the mainland. It is designated as an Area of Special Scientific Interest, Special Protection Area, and Ramsar Site in order to protect the wetland environment, particularly due to the presence of certain bird species and shellfish. Larne Lough is an excellent spot for bird watching as birds can be viewed from the sea on the sanctuary at Muck Island. Location: On the outskirts of Larne.

Attractions Carrickfergus Castle stands in a strategic position on a rocky spur above the harbour on the northern shore of Lough Belfast and is a perfectly preserved Norman castle, probably the earliest stone castle in all Ireland. John de Courcy, the Anglo-Norman baron who conquered much of Ulster and governed it from 1177 to 1204 started building the castle in about 1178 to guard the approach to Lough Belfast. Today it is maintained by the Environment and Heritage Service. About 9 miles south of Larne.

Carrickfergus Castle

Larne hotels

Visitor attractions and information - Limavady

Attractions Roe Valley Country Park, 41 Dogleap Rd, Limavady BT49 9NN - Tel: 028 7772 2074. Roe Valley Country Park runs for 3 miles either side of the River Roe near Limavady. The Park is the habitat of foxes, badgers and otters and over 60 species of bird have been seen here.The Country Park contains a countryside museum and the Dogleap Centre where the story of the valley is told. About 2 mile south of Limavady.

Roe Valley Country Park

Attractions City of Derry Airport is conveniently located just 4 miles west of Limavady on the main A2 highway to Londonderry. www.cityofderryairport.com. About 6 miles west of Limavady.

Attractions The famous 1000-year-old Broighter Gold is a magnificent example of Celtic metal work skills. It was discovered just outside Limavady, by what must have been a very surprised looking farm worker. This ancient treasure can be admired in the "National Museum of Ireland" in Dublin.

Broighter Gold

Limavady hotels

Visitor attractions and information - Newcastle

Attractions Newcastle is known for its sandy beach and has all the usual seaside attractions - amusements, restaurants and takeaways, caravan parks, a boating lake, a bowling green and golf course, harbour, parkland and promenade. Location: In the centre of Newcastle.

Newcastle

Attractions Tollymore Forest Park, Bryansford Road, Newcastle, Co Down - BT33 0HJ. A magnificent avenue of Deodar cedars is a striking feature of the entrance to this romantic forest park in the foothills of the Mourne mountains. Four way-marked trails of varying lengths take the visitor on a tour of the parks most beautiful areas. These trails follow a circular route and are sign-posted from the information board in the main car park.The forest is open every day of the year from 10am until sunset. About 2 miles west of Newcastle.

Tollymore Forest Park

Attractions Murlough National Nature Reserve, Dundrum, County Down - BT33 0NQ. A fragile 6000 year old sand dune system owned by the National Trust and managed as Ireland’s first Nature Reserve since 1967. It is an excellent area for walking and bird watching due to its spectacular location at the edge of Dundrum Bay and the Mourne Mountains. About 3 miles south of Newcastle.

Newcastle hotels

Visitor attractions and information - Newry

Attractions Derrymore House, Bessbrook, Newry, Co. Armagh BT35 7EF - Tel: 028 8778 4753 (The Argory). Late 18th-century thatched house in gentrified vernacular style. National Trust. Charges apply. www.nationaltrust.org.uk. About 2 miles west of Newry.

Derrymore House

Attractions Ring of Gullion Way. The Ring of Gullion Way starts in the town of Newry and follows the natural geological formation known as a ring-dyke through the Ring of Gullion Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Highlights include stunning views of Slieve Gullion, the surrounding ring-dyke, Carlingford Lough and the Mourne Mountains. A variety of standing stones and historic monuments in quiet unspoilt landscapes. Location: On the outskirts of Newry.

Ring of Gullion Way

Attractions Newry Cathedral is the most commanding building in Newry city centre. It was built in 1829 of local granite at a cost of £8000 and was the first Catholic Cathedral opened after the granting of Catholic Emancipation. In the centre of Newry.

Newry Cathedral

Newry hotels

Visitor attractions and information - Omagh

Attractions Omagh Courthouse, High Street, Omagh, County Tyrone BT78. This courthouse dominates the High Street and is the town’s most distinctive building. The architect of this magnificent structure was John Hargrave of Cork. The structure, as seen today incorporates the plan of an Old Market House around which it was built. It was constructed in two parts between 1814 and 1863 at a cost of £17,000. The Tuscan columned portico was added in 1824. Location: In the centre of Omagh.

Omagh Courthouse

Attractions Sacred Heart Church, Castle Street, Omagh, County Tyrone BT78. This church was designed by William Hague and dedicated by Cardinal Logue in 1899. It was built on the highest point in the town, replacing the old chapel of St Peter and St Paul built in Brook Street in 1829. The Rose Window with the High Altar below was provided by parishioners, who had emigrated to New York, as a memorial to the late Archbishop Hughes, first Archbishop of St Patrick’s Cathedral, New York. It has been recently re-furbished. Location: In the centre of Omagh.

Sacred Heart Church

Attractions ULSTER AMERICAN FOLK PARK, CASTLETOWN, OMAGH, COUNTY TYRONE BT78 5QY - TEL: 028 8224 3292. The open-air museum tells the story of emigration from Ulster to America in the 18th & 19th centuries and provides visitors with a "living history" experience on its outdoor site. Costumed demonstrators go about their everyday tasks in the traditional manner in authentically furnished Old and New World buildings. The Ship and Dockside Gallery features a full-size reconstruction of an early 19th century sailing ship of the type which carried thousands of emigrants across the Atlantic. www.folkpark.com. About 2 miles north of Omagh.

ULSTER AMERICAN FOLK PARK

Omagh hotels

Visitor attractions and information - Portrush

Giant's Causeway Visitor Centre

Attractions Giant's Causeway Visitor Centre, 44 Causeway Road, Bushmills BT57 8SU - Tel: 028-2073-1855. Northern Ireland's most popular tourist destination, this large stretch of staircase-shaped rocks is a geological freak, the result of cooled lava from volcanic eruptions that took place over 65 million years ago. About 3 miles northeast of Portrush.

Giant's Causeway

Attractions Carrick-a-Rede bridge, near Ballycastle, is a swinging rope bridge spanning an 800 feet wide chasm connecting the main land to the Carrick-a-Rede island which is used by fishermen. The bridge crossing is quite thrilling and not for the faint hearted! It is open between the months of April and September. About 7 miles northeast of Portrush.

Carrick-a-Rede bridge

Attractions Old Bushmills Distillery, Bushmills, Co. Antrim Tel: 028 2073-3218. The Old Bushmills Distillery is devoted to the production of Single Malt Irish Whiskey. It is the world’s oldest licensed whiskey distillery having received its licence to distil in 1608 by James 1of England. An exceptional aspect of The Old Bushmills Distillery is the fact that distilling, blending, maturation and bottling are all carried out under one roof. www.bushmills.com. About 5 miles east of Portrush.

Old Bushmills Distillery

Attractions Dunluce Castle, near Portrush. This late-medieval and 17th-century castle is dramatically sited on a headland dropping sheer into the sea on the north Antrim Coast. For information on visits to Dunluce Castle, please contact EHS (Environment and Heritage Service) on Tel: 028 20 73 1938. There is an entrance gate from the car-park into sloping mainland court which is linked to the main buildings on the rock by a narrow footbridge. There are some modern surfaces but there are also areas of original paving and cobbles, which will make access to parts of the site difficult for wheelchair-users. About 2 miles east of Portrush.

Dunluce Castle

Attractions Downhill Castle, Mussenden Temple, Bishop’s Gate & Black Glen, 107 Sea Road, Castlerock, BT51 4TW - Tel: 028 7084 8728. Set on a stunning and wild headland with fabulous cliff top walks and views over Ireland’s north coast is the landscaped estate of Downhill, laid out in the late 18th century by the eccentric Earl and Bishop, Frederick Hervey. Estate includes ruins, mausoleum, beautiful gardens and the renowned Mussenden Temple perched on the cliff edge which is available for private hire. About 4 miles west of Coleraine.

Downhill Castle

Portrush hotels

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